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Axiomatic / Maria Tumarkin.

Axiomatic / Maria Tumarkin.

This boundary-shifting fusion of thinking, storytelling, and meditation takes as its starting point five axioms: 'Give Me a Child Before the Age of 7 and I'll Give You the (Wo)Man' ; 'History Repeats Itself.' ; 'Those Who Forget the Past are Condemned to Repeat It' ; 'You Can't Enter The Same River Twice' ; 'Time Heals All Wounds'. These beliefs or intuitions about the role the past plays in our present are often evoked as if they are timeless and self-evident truths. It is precisely because they are neither, yet still we are persuaded by them, that they tell us a great deal about the forces that shape our culture and the way we live. The past shapes the present they teach us this in schools and universities. But the past cannot be visited like an ageing relative; the past doesn't live in little zoo enclosures. Half the time, the past is nothing less than the beating heart of the present. So, how to speak of the searing, unpindownable power that the past ours, our family's, our culture's wields now?

Item Information
Date Barcode Shelf Location Collection Volume Ref. Branch Status Due Date Reserve
30 Sep 2019 200369131 A824.4 TUM
Literature - Adult Non Fiction   Moruya . . On Loan . 19 Dec 2019
. Catalogue Record 821851 ItemInfo Beginning of record . Catalogue Record 821851 ItemInfo Top of page .
Catalogue Information
Field name Details
Shelf Location 824.4 TUM
Author Tumarkin, Maria M.
Title Axiomatic / Maria Tumarkin.
Publication Details Australia : Brow Books, 2018.
Description 201 pages ; 21 cm.
Notes This boundary-shifting fusion of thinking, storytelling, and meditation takes as its starting point five axioms: 'Give Me a Child Before the Age of 7 and I'll Give You the (Wo)Man' ; 'History Repeats Itself.' ; 'Those Who Forget the Past are Condemned to Repeat It' ; 'You Can't Enter The Same River Twice' ; 'Time Heals All Wounds'. These beliefs or intuitions about the role the past plays in our present are often evoked as if they are timeless and self-evident truths. It is precisely because they are neither, yet still we are persuaded by them, that they tell us a great deal about the forces that shape our culture and the way we live. The past shapes the present they teach us this in schools and universities. But the past cannot be visited like an ageing relative; the past doesn't live in little zoo enclosures. Half the time, the past is nothing less than the beating heart of the present. So, how to speak of the searing, unpindownable power that the past ours, our family's, our culture's wields now?
Subject Time -- Philosophy
Australian essays
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Catalogue Information 821851 Beginning of record . Catalogue Information 821851 Top of page .